Tidbits of Hampshire History

Interesting & Unusual Facts From Various Sources

This page includes information from various sources, mainly the "Years Ago" column in the Hampshire Review, but including a few other sources. You may find it convenient to search for words in this page if you are looking for something in particular. If there is a date below the paragraph, it indicates the date the paper was published; the first date is our approximation of the actual date of the event. Items in brackets [] are editor's additions.

Please Note: There is a Timeline of Hampshire County history - click here


 1700

January 13, 1791 Perez Drew was granted a license to keep an ordinary (a tavern or eating house) at his house in the town of Romney. At a court held that same year it was "the opinion of the court they out to adjourn to the house of Perez Drew because the courthouse was in such a ruinous sitation." Hampshire Review - The Genealogy Corner


 1800

1816 An idictment was brought against Andrew Dimmitt for challenging Jacob Taylor to fight a duel. Hampshire Review - The Genealogy Corner

1818 George Leps was summoned to court to show cause on information filed against him for refusing to ferry Abraham Barnes and brother across the Great Cacapeon at the ferry established upon the land he held as tenant under John Copsey. Hampshire Review - The Genealogy Corner

April 14, 1845 Ad appears in the newspaper asking for bids on building for the Literary Society; it would become the Romney Classical Institute. Builder may have been Tobias Mytinger.


 1850

c1850 - c1862 The Virginia Argus and Hampshire Advertiser was published in the county.**

May 27, 1884 "The Post Office at Kirby, West Virginia, was established on May 27, 1884 with Mrs. Lucinda Jane Kirby appointed the first postmaster. The records also show that Elmer S. Bailey (Route 12383-Romney to Inderman) was the mail contractor (carrier) who served this office." [National Archives and Records Administration 6/24/1976]

July, 12, 1888 Henry Scruggs, Instantaneous Photographer, will move to Capon Springs in a few days, and remain during the season. Will be pleased to do work for the people of this and surrounding county as well as for the regular borders. [May 4, 1927 Hampshire History]

January 24, 1889 Mr. Moorehead, of the Smithsonian Institution, a notice of whose cisit to this community in search of Indian relics appeared in last week’s Review, returned on Monday after having pretty thoroughly examined the place where the skeletons were found in 1877 on Pancake’s Island, the Mounds on Mess. Frank Herriott and G. W. Parson’s farms. He found quite a number of skeletons, the skulls of some of them pretty well preserved, a large number of beads, copper trinkets, tomahawks, ear rings, arrow heads, and a few whole clay pots, but nothing of especial interest. His investigations did not verify the report as to what was unearthed by the [recent] freshet. [Hampshire History]

January 16, 1891 The Romney Manufacturing, Land and Improvement Company was advertising that a "desirable residence or business lot" would be given with "every 10 shares of stock". E. M. Gilkeson was General Manager and J. E. Russel, Secretary January 9, 1991

Nov. , 1893 The distillery at Yellow Spring has resumed operation. Orndorff, who is the personification of neatness, produces a genuine article which in its way is useful.
Hopkins Lick - The roller mill owned by Power, Stump and Company is doing a fine business. They take in daily about one hundred bushels of grain. [Review 11/10/1993]

c. Nov. - Dec., 1993 The school house at Cold Stream known as Walnut Grove has been recently moved to Leath's Mountain and is in successful operation under the instruction of C. E. Riley [Review 100 years ago]

December 1, 1893 The Riverside Tannery one mile west of Romney burned down. [Review 12/2/1994]

August 27, 1894 Springfield - J. N. Rannells and George Johnson drove a nice lot of cattle through town Sunday purchased in Pennsylvania August 31, 1994
August 27, 1894 The Town Council is determined to have an additional water supply. The Spring question has been thoroughly discussed and all the springs in the surrounding country examined. A proposition has been made by R. L. Kidner to drill a two-hundred foot well and pump the water, at a rate of 600 gallons per hour, into the reservoir, by means of a wind engine, or wind mill. The council held a special meeting on Monday night and it was agreed to contract with Mr. Kidner to do the work, provided the voters of the town agree to an ordinance for the amount necessary to defray the expense. In the mean time the work of paving the streets will go on. August 31, 1994

April 3, 1895 The Review has long since become one of the permanent institutions of the town and country and now it proposes to have a permanent home. We have purchased a lot adjoining the Gibson corner, on Main street, and ground has already been broken for the erection of a commodious brick building, the ground floor of which will be used exclusively for the offices of the paper. The second floor will be used for law offices. April 5, 1995

July 15, 1896 The Intelligencer has moved into the lower part of the Literary Hall and is comfortably ensconced in its new quarters. July 17, 1996

c.1897 The Times, allegedly a Republican newspaper, was published in Romney.**

August 23, 1899 The monument erected by public subscription to the memory of Holland D. Thompson, Hampshire County’s only offering to the Spanish-American War, was unveiled and dedicated at Three Churches Wednesday in the presence of a very large crowd, despite the fact that the dust made traveling very disagreeable [100 Years Ago]


 1900

April 24, 1901 Burr Matthews found a coin under the foundation of the Old Taylor house, opposite the Parker hotel, that is the oldest one ever picked up in these parts. It is about the size of a half dollar, is a copper coin and of English issue. On one side is a figure of justice while around the figure is "Britain V.I.N. 1740." The house, which was torn down a few days ago, was built more than a hundred years ago and was the oldest house in this, the oldest town in the state.

August 7, 1902 George B. Shank of Burlington, has put on an independent stage line between Romney and Moorefield beginning Monday morning with handsome new stages. [100Years Ago]

August 27, 1902 The “Yankees” have again taken Romney, this time without firing a shot and nobody ran from them either. The whole town, almost, turned out to meet them at the depot. The members of the 54th Pa. Regiment, who are holding their reunion here, came in on the afternoon train and were met at the depot by the local Confederate organization, headed by the Romney Band and escorted to the courthouse where an address of welcome on behalf of the ex-Confederates was made by W.B. Cornwell.

July 15, 1903 The village of North River Mills was very nearly annihilated by the most disasterous flood ever known in her history on the afternoon of June 28. The heavy rainfall caused a rapid rise in the Riggs Hollow Run and fed by other streams it rushed down the narrow gap and took the village as its victim. The old store house belonging to Sheriff Miller, stable of R. Kidwell, the dwelling residence of Miss Lane miller, william Moreland's buggy shed and two buggies, his store building almost washed away and Mr. Miller's and John Gess' buggies were all washed away. The road was torn and rendered impassable for miles. This is the year of great floods. July 16, 2003

February 24, 1904 An ice gorge 16 miles long is reported lodged in the Potomac River against Dam No. 6. There is considerable anxiety among land owners along that section. [100 Years Ago]

September 21, 1904 John T. Goldsborough, who recently resigned his position as B. & O. agent here, has purchased the general store of E. V. Parker on the corner just east of the Review office.

May 2, 1906 The Bank of Romney has let the contract for removing the Heiskell house to T. Y. Wolford. It will be moved back on the rear of the lot adjoining the D. H. Heiskell lot to make room for the new bank building.
May 2, 1906 Quite a large wild cat was killed on Julius Coffman's farm last week weighing 22 pound, largest killed in this section for years.

June 6, 1906 J. R. Mowrey of North River, showed us last week some rate old coins found in an old chimney on Henry Richard place near Delray. This was one of the oldest houses in that section and one of the coins is 175 years old. The coins are English, coined during the reign of George II.
June 6, 1906 John Henshaw, John Lehman and W. B. Cornwell, all of Fairmont, drove over from Keyser Sunday evening. They were looking over the land purchased by them on the mountain of west Mechanicsburg Gap where they contemplate putting an orchard.

October 30, 1906 The ornate and beautiful church built by J. H. Hause and Co., of Cumberland, for the Presbyterians of Springfield, and which gives such general satisfaction will be dedicated on Sunday, Nov. 11, Dr. F. J. Brooke, G. W. Finley and James E. Mottatt are expected to be present.

February 27, 1907 A partial carload of mules arrived here sunday from Baltimore where they were purchased by H. C. Innskeep, manager of the Hampshire Orchard Company. The mules are intened for use in the new orchards that are being cleared on the mountain west of Mechanicsburg Gap. 2/28/07

March 6, 1907 J. I. Keller has rented the Keller House to William Hendrickson, formerly of Moorefield, but more recently of Maysville, Grant County. The house has been run by some member of the Keller family continually almost since the war.

April 3, 1907 Keller's Hotel caught fire Sunday evening and it was only because of the timely discovery of the blaze that there was not a conflagration in the upper end of town. A number of persons were sitting in the office when the blaze was discovered in the kitchen. The blaze was sweeping up the stairway at a furious rate, but by prompt and vigorous efforts it was quickly subdued.
April 3, 1907 the Romney post office changed hands last Saturday, the new postmaster, T. E. Pownall, taking charge. New furniture will be installed with about 150 lock boxes and some 250 call boxes. it will be moved to the new bank building as soon as the center room is completed, and it will be made an up-to-date presidential office. Misses Maud Parker and Fannie High are to so the active work in the office.

September 25, 1907 A stave mill located by R. S. Dillon and G. W. Smith, near Vance's Station, two miles north of Romney, is completed and will begin operations this week. It will give employment to 10 men and will consume from seven to 10 cords of wood per day. If sufficient wood is obtainable the owners expect to put in another saw which will require about 20 men and consume 15 to 20 cords of wood daily. 9/26/07

October 7, 1907 The largest shipment of cattle to leave Romney in one day, probably since the place became a stopping point, was on Thursday when 26 carloads went out. The cattle, from Hardy and Grant counties, were a choice lot and were all for export. On the same day there was received here 11 carloads of fertilizer. Romney is a place of some importance after all. 10/3/07

November 27, 1907 Sen. and Mrs. William Campbell and their son, Billy, were the guests of the family of John J. Cornwell last week. During his stay here Sen. Campbell made a through inspection of the Hampshire Orchard Company’s 1,000-acre orchard in which he is largely interested. With the additional 24,000 peach trees to be planted this fall this orchard will be one of the largest in the east.

January 8, 1908 the Grassy Lick Methodist Church located five miles east of town was consumed by fire on Christmas night. The fire is supposed to have originated from a Christmas tree which was lighted during a celebration that had been held that evening.
January 8, 1908 The several denominations of Romney has united in a Christian brotherhood and are soliciting subscriptions to aid them in establishing a gymnasium and reading room in the new bank building to be conducted on the order of the YMCA.

May 20, 1908 An Artesian Well - Cecil Sanders drilled a well at the canning factory at the depot last week for Cunningham brothers and struck a stream of water that flows out at the top. The well now cased up, extending above the ground and the water continues to overflow the casing.

September 16, 1908 Monday morning the body of a white man horribly crushed and mangled was found on the tracks of the railroad near the station. Investigation proved it to be that of William Sturgiss of this place.

November 4, 1908 Misses Leila and Lucy Johnson left Saturday for Chicago, which place they expect to make their future home.
November 4, 1908 The last survivor of the Mexican War in this county passed away when Peter Miller died at this home in this place on Wednesday night of last week aged about 84 years. Miller was likewise a soldier in the Confederate army. Deceased was married three times. [buried Indian Mound cemetery]

November 11, 1908 Three Churches - The members of the Baptist Church at this place have torn down the old church and have made every arrangement to build a much larger and commodious edifice.

May 5, 1909 J. W. Belt of Glebe, was in town Friday, having just rafted a lot of ties down from Buzzard Ford. He has rafted over 23,000 ties so far this spring.
May 5, 1909 The Baptist Church at Three Churches will be dedicated the second Sunday in May. Elder C. H. Waters, of Washington, will preach the dedicatory sermon. Elder B. W. Power is the pastor of the church, which has just been finished, and is a handsome and commodious structure.

May 12, 1909 What was practically the first wreck on the Romney branch of the B&O Railroad occurred near Buffalo trestle, about a mile and a half from Romney on Wednesday night when the evening train was on its way here. Several cattle got on the track and were struck by the engine and the cars were derailed. The passenger coach took fire and was entirely consumed. There were very few passengers on the train, but all were more or less injured.

May 26, 1909 The contract for the proposed railroad from Romney to Petersburg has been let and work will begin as soon as rights of way can be secured. A corps of engineers will begin work today mapping the rights of way. The money for the work has all been provided. Rooms on the second floor of the bank building are being prepared for the offices for the Hampshire Southern Railroad Company.

July 7, 1909 Miss Etta Washington, of Hampshire County, has been visiting Mrs. James H. Wolff, S. Charles Street. This is Miss Washington's first visit to Charles Town since she and her sister, patriotic southern girls, rode here on horseback, a distance of 52 miles during the war between the states, to deliver a message to Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson. - From Charles Town Spirit.

August 4, 1909 At a meeting of the stockholders of the Farmers Exchange held at the courthouse Saturday, it was decided to rebuild the mill recently destroyed by fire, at once. The mill will be made as nearly fireproof as possible.

October 20, 1909 The corporate authorities have torn up the sidewalk on the south side of the main street from Goldsborough's Store to the Parker house preparatory to putting in a substantial sidewalk. this will be an improvement much needed and a comfort to the pedestrians.
October 20, 1909 The first train to run over the Hampshire Southern Railroad passed over the uncompleted bridge over the South Branch last week. It was a work train composed of 12 cars. It looks odd to see a number of cars on the track to Harmison's bottomland.

November 10, 1909 Former Sen. William Campbell spent several days in the county inspecting the Hampshire and Romney Mountain Orchards in both of which he is a director. The former company is increasing its present planting of 30,000 peach trees and 50,000 and 10,000 apple trees, making the orchards the largest operation in the east.

December 8, 1909 Fire was discovered in the canning factory owned by George Cunningham shortly after midnight Friday. Before people could be aroused, the flames had made great headway and within an hour the building was in ruins. About half the crop of canned tomatoes put up this year were destroyed. Cunningham and George Haberlander had been in the factory a few hours before and saw no sign of fire.
December 8, 1909 Watson Literary Society had a debate at the last meeting on the question, "Resolved, That Cuba should be annexed to the United States." Those on the affirmative were Melvin Loy and Seymour Loy. On the negative side were Bursie Heare and Oscar Wolford.

December 15, 1909 James T. Dailey, of this place, died at his home last Sunday morning. The deceased was the second son of the late Dr. W. R. Dailey and a brother of Judge Dailey. He was a soldier in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Soon after the war he went to the far west where he remained for 20 years. Returning here 15 years ago he married a Miss Mary, only daughter of the late J. C. Heiskoll, who survives him.

April 19, 1911 G.W. Ogden, of Augusta, will preach in the Literary Hall Sunday at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. exchanging appointments with J.A. Hopkins.

September 20, 1911 One of the largest crowds ever gathered here for a similar event was present last Thursday, the occasion being the reunion of the ex-Confederates of Old Hampshire. In the early forenoon the roads were thick with vehicles and the morning trains poured their throngs into town, so that by noon the streets were crowded. Two bands helped the enjoyment of the occasion - the Barr band, of Hardy County, and the Ruckman band, of this county - rendered patriotic airs during the day. In the afternoon the crowd gathered in front of a platform erected at the west side of the Court House. Judge Dailey introduced the Rev. George W. Peterkin, of the Episcopal Diocese of West Virginia, who addressed the throng. Following this, Miss Lulu Taylor recited a poem with splendid expression and rare grace of delivery. Senator "Bob" Taylor of Tennessee, arrived at this time and was introduced by John J. Cornwell, and made an excellent address. [Review "Back in Time" September 21, 2011]

September 27, 1911 George E. Harmison's Valley View Addition lot sale, west of Romney depot, last Saturday was a success. He sold 21 lots at public auction and several privately, at an average of about $125. The free lot went to J.H. Newhouse. Mr. Harmison set apart two lots on a bluff overlooking the river as a hospital site and offers to deed them to the town, to trustees or anyone undertaking the work of erecting a hospital. He invites the ministers and physicians to take hold of the matter and appoint a committee to confer with him. The site is a most beautiful one, the view magnificent and the location close to the depot and the town. [Review September 28, 2011]

Oct. 25, 1911 A charter has been issued to Potomac Highlands Orchard Company, of Romney, to plant and grow orchards in Allegheny County, Md. The authorized capital is $10,000 and the incorporators: M.E. Ailes, of Washington, D.C.; Eugene E. Ailes and John J. Cornwell, of Romney; A.E. Ailes and C.C. Ailes, of Okonoko. [Oct. 26, 2011]

Oct. 25, 1911 Samuel T. Haines sent to The Review office Tuesday a twig not over a foot long bearing 15 good sized and highly colored Ben Davis apples. [November 2, 2011]

January 3, 1912 Five to six inches of ice has formed on the river and ponds in this neighborhood and is being harvested. [Review Jan. 11, 2012]

September 24, 1913 A Modern Hotel [New Century Hotel] to be erected in Romney on Site of Old Century - The old Keller property has been sold to a number of local people. The deal was closed last week, Miss Hoppie Keller acting as agent for the Keller heirs.
This means that Romney is to have a modern hotel and have it at once. The various gentlemen interested, as soon as title has been obtained to the property, will organize a company, to which the property will be conveyed and which will build the hotel. The money for the purpose has been subscribed and the stock will not be offered to the general public.
The old hotel building on the property is one of the town's landmarks. it is said to have sheltered George Washington on this various trips into the South Branch Valley. For many years it was owned and managed by the late Thomas Keller. At his death it passed, by will, to his widow, for life. She and her son, the late J. I. Keller, each made the old place famous for its meals. For nearly ten years it has been abandoned, as a hotel.
It is understood that the new hotel building, which will be erected on the lot, will be built of brick and concrete. While it will not be a large building, it well be large enough to meet the needs of the town and will be up-to-date in every particular.
With splendid sewerage and water systems, with concrete pavements, electric lights and a modern hotel, Romney will be an ideal place to visit.

March 8, 1922 The B & O Railroad Company is having constructed two large, specially designed motor cars for passenger service between Green Spring, Romney, Moorefield and Petersburg. They will seat twenty-four and thirty-four passengers, respectively, one of them being a trailer.

March 15, 1922 Indictments from Grand Jury for operating a still and possessing "mash": Howard Moreland, Virgin Heare, Hamp Haines, Dave Iser, Otis Moreland and A. S. Landis

July 19, 1944 One of the largest shipments of cattle from this section moved from the station at Vanderlip last week, sixty head, weighing more than 1300 pounds each. They were sold by Sam and John Pancake to a Pennsylvania buyer and were consigned to New York.

October 8, 1947 One of the oldest buildings in Romney, formerly known as the Parker Hotel, is being pulled down by its owners, S. R. and John I. Pancake. Just when this building was erected no one appears to know but its use as a hotel can be traced back a century. When Mr. Cornwell came to Romney as principal of the public school 59 years ago he took up residence in room no. 10 at this hotel of which the late I. V. Parker was proprietor. October 8, 1997


 1950

February 13, 1952 Martin M. Mansperger of Freeport, New York, who purchased The Hill property north of Romney, originally used as a home by Prescott Huiidekper and later owned by Austin Baughman, commissioner of Automobile Vehicles of Maryland, has just retired as principal of the Freeport High School after 22 years in that position. Upon his retirement Jan. 31, 1952, a number of events were given in his honor, including a dinner attended by 250 persons

July 15, 1953 Two large fire ponds were completed last week in Springfield in an effort to insure that village an adequate water supply for the prevention and spread of fires. July 16, 2003

September 8, 1954 Mrs. William C. Parker, Romney's eldest daughter, will celebrate her 98th birthday Sept. 21. On that date in 1856 in this little Virginia town, five years before the War Between the states and seven years before West Virginia became a state, this young lady arrived in the Mytinger home, the third child of a family of four sons and six daughters of the late Tobias and Martha Virginia Maloney Mytinger. Mrs. Parker's entire life has been spent in her hometown. Small though she was she recalls some of the stirring events of the war years when Romney was occupied alternately by Union and Confederate soldiers 56 recorded and uncounted unrecorded times during that internecine struggle. She has witnessed the shifting scenes, customs and standards of American life and the gradual changes that have taken place in Romney - from a quiet, conservative Virginia village to its present busy, noisy, modern existence.

November 28, 1956 Cold Stream - Here is one from the older generation recently picked up in some old papers. There is a peak that juts out above Capon River known as Darby's Nose. In the War of Independence a man by the name of Darby lived at its foot (hence the name). He was a trustee of an old log church nearby, Church of England, in that day, and now the Episcopal Church, to which they have a deed. The church has been gone for some years but a cemetery is still on the ground. The church was attended by the settlers from Fort Edwards, where they went with their flint-lock guns to worship. If an Indian came along they had to make a run for the fort, but while making that run they sent back some ammunition at their pursuers. Darby owned a buck sheep (so the story goes), a pet. if any of the settlers from the surrounding territory bothered around who had been in company with John Barleycorn, the sheep was the first to notice it and he would proceed to come against them like a locomotive and promptly get them off the ground. some of the settlers immortalized this into a song "Darby's Ram."

February 27, 1957 The construction of Romney's new steel-tank reservoir is completed and will be in use tomorrow morning. It has a capacity of 200,000 gallons and when connected with the old reservoir will have a total capacity of 310,000 gallons, as reported by Mayor Shear. 2/28/07

September 25, 1957 The first annual Hampshire County Fair will be held at Augusta, Saturday, Sept. 28 beginning at noon. There will be commercial exhibits, a horse show, 4-H exhibits, an old fiddlers contest, a band contest and much more. 9/26/07

September 10, 1958 The second annual Hampshire County Fair will be held at Augusta, Sept. 19 and 20. This year it was necessary to find a new ground to accommodate the expanded two-day affair. The site chosen is on the top of the hill behind French's Mill. There will be plenty of space for good off-the-highway parking. Interesting programs have been planned each day besides the exhibits and horse show and ball game. There will be a talent show, contests and selection and crowning of Queen of Hampshire.

November 19, 1958 During the halftime of the Romney-Berkeley Springs football game Friday, a ceremony was held honoring Romney High School graduates who gave their lives in World War II. The boys honored were: Donald M. Cookman, Russell Duckworth, Paul P. Harmison, Clinton R. Ricewick, Kenneth M. Taylor, William C. Doman, Wallace Grapes, William F. Pownall, Oscar Rowzee Jr., Eugene W. Tharp, and Maurice O. Michael. The plaque reads: "Romney High School pays tribute to the memory of her sons who gave the last measure of devotion to their country."

April 26, 1961 The Addition of Savilla Vale has officially become a part of the town of Romney, having been incorporated in the town limits as a result of the favorable vote cast in the special election held on April 5. The voters in favor of the annexation of Savilla Vale, both residents of Romney and of the Addition, were over whelmingly in favor of the proposition.

September 12, 1962 Two Houses Added To Romney House Tour October 6-7
"The Burg" and "Sycamore Dale" have been added to the itinerary of the second annual house tour of the Romney Woman's Club October 6 and 7.
"The Burg" is located at the west end of Mechanicsburg Gap, three miles west of Romney on U. S. Route 50. this was the home of the late Senator George H. Williams. it is now occupied by Mrs. Williams and George Holland Williams, II. it has been in the Meens-Taylor-Williams family for seven generations.
The Means family came to America from Tyrone County, Ireland, about 1730. "The Burg" was the manor house of Isaac Meens, who came to Hampshire County in 1769. Edward Taylor married a daughter, Margaret Means, in 1808 and lived at the Burg. His son, William Taylor, married Margaret Parker and was the grandfather of Senator Williams.
The home is noted for its hospitality and has many family records on display.
Sycamore Dale, built by Colonel David Gibson in 1839, is located on the South Branch River Road, one mile west of Romney.
It is said this house was used by General Lew Wallace, author of "Ben Hur," as his headquarters on his first trip to Romney during the Civil War. this is the site of the final surrender of the famous McNeill Rangers.
It is the present residence of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Williams.

November 23, 1966 Long's Building Supply has been awarded a contract to build a juvenile detention quarters addition to the Hampshire County jail. [??]

February 22, 1967 An electrical control building is being built in order to house the proper electrical and chemical feed equipment for the sewage pump station of the town of Romney. 2/28/07

September 27, 1967 Mr. and Mrs. J. Holland Rannells will be presented the keys to the new library building at the formal dedication services which will be held tomorrow afternoon. This beautiful and utilitarian structure has been made possible through the generous gift of all local funds by Mr. and Mrs. Rannells, members of the Library Board. This entire project is the result of much dedicated work, contributions toward endowment and support by many individuals interested in the educational and cultural needs of the community. 9/26/07

October 4, 1967 The heaviest rain of the year, which washed out plans for an outdoor ceremony and delayed the arrival of Gov. Hulett C. Smith for several hours, failed to dampen the spirits and enthusiasm of the people of Hampshire County for their new library. More than a thousand local people and numerous visitors from other communities turned out Thursday afternoon and evening for the dedication ceremonies and open house of the newly completed Hampshire County Library.

March 27, 1968 Miss Leila Houser, of Romney, celebrated her 101st birthday March 25. Born in Romney March 25, 1867, she is the oldest resident of the oldest town in West Virginia. Her life has spanned nearly half the life of this town. Miss Houser is a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs Henry Houser. Her father was a harness maker and operated his business in the building now occupied by Houser's TV Sales. the television shop is owned and operated by John H. Houser, grandson of Henry Houser. Miss Houser spent all her life in an apartment in the same building.

August 13, 1969 A graveside service will be held Thursday at noon at Indian Mound Cemetery for George Preston Marshall. The founder of the Washington Redskins will be laid to rest alongside his mother in the family plot. Marshall, who died early Saturday, was born at Romney almost 73 years ago.

December 3, 1969 Army Sergeant Donald W. Michael, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene L. Michael, Augusta, received the Army Commendation Medal Nov. 1 during ceremonies near Phu Bai, Vietnam, Sgt. Michael earned the award for meritorious service while serving as a driver in the 108th Transportation Company.

Sept. 29, 1971 J. Kenton Lambert, state director of the Farmers Home Administration has announced the approval of preliminary engineering for the construction of a public water system by the Central Hampshire Water, Inc. The project will serve the area from Romney city limits east along U.S. Route 50, passing through Augusta, ending at the intersection of Highway 45. The project cost of the water facility is $810,000. 40 years ago-10/5/11

Jan. 19, 1972 The gateway of Indian Mound cemetery has been restored and remodeled to widen the entrance. The wrought iron gate was widened by the addition of the dates 1762 and 1860, signifying the date the Town of Romney was chartered and the date the Indian Mound Cemetery Association was formed and received the deed for the land. Completion of the remodeled gateway marks the first stage of the project now going on for the restoration and beautification of the community burial place. 40 Years Ago

December 5, 1979 The estate of Warner Jackson presented to Hampshire Memorial Hospital a check in the amount of $15,191.98, which Jackson had bequeathed to the hospital in his Last Will and Testament. This was a gift of appreciation to the community by Warner Jackson, who was born, lived and worked in Romney all is life. His father was a freed slave and the entire Jackson family was always held in the highest regard by the citizens of Romney.

September 12, 1984 The Mayor of Romney Larry Miller, presented the key to the city of Romney to the Mayor of New Romney, England, The Honorable A. E. (Ted) Carey, on Saturday during Heritage Days. The city of Romney was named for New Romney, and Mayor Carey and his wife were special guests during Heritage Days.

June 26, 1991 Gov. Gaston Caperton has announced that the Potomac Eagle will make its inaugural run along the South Branch River during the July 4th holiday. [June 29, 2011]

September 18, 1991 The Hampshire County Commission passed a resolution last week to sell tax free revenue bonds for the construction of a 62-bed nursing home to be located near the Food Lion Shopping Center and facing U.S. Route 50. If the legalities can be worked out, the commission would act as landlords for the facility and would contract with Glenmark Associates of Morgantown to manage it.

Oct. 9, 1991 The dry weather has been a major advantage for an early completion of the new Capon Bridge Elementary School. Superintendent Gerald Mathias said last week that according to Clerk of Works Kevin Lewis the project should be completed around the first of November. The tentative plan is to move the students into the school sometime in December, but no later than the first of January. [Review Oct. 12, 2011]

Jan. 21, 1992   Jan. 21st was the first day for students to attend school at the new Capon Bridge Elementary. Gov. Gaston Caperton plans to be present for the dedication of the new building which will take place Thursday, Feb. 13. [Review January 29, 1992]


** We are looking for information on the Argus and the Times newspapers and hope to publish an article in the future on these papers. Please send us any information you may have.